OLWG #135- MissFortune

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



When Isobel Fortune finished school and earned her teaching credentials she began applying for jobs with the neighbourhood schools around her parent’s home, where she lived with her Mum and Dad. She had grown up and lived in this house since her Dad had been transferred from Brighton when she was four years old. She had attended Burford School on the bottom road when she was a child and had been in constant trouble almost the entire time she was there.

Isobel had no luck with the local schools so she began to expand her search and sending her CV to schools closer to the city; then into the city proper. It took almost an entire year but she finally got an invitation for an interview with the headmaster of a primary school close to the city centre. Many of the students came from immigrant and indigent families. They relied on the school for lunches and rudimentary supplies like paper and pencils. She took the position teaching Year 3 and started a month and a half into the school year.

She arrived early on that first day and made her way to her classroom. The class had been covered by a temporary instructor since the beginning of the year and she was not too sure what to expect. She organized her lesson plans and neatly printed her name in the top right corner of the blackboard board at the front of the classroom. She wasn’t sure why they called it a blackboard when it was green.

When the bell sounded and the students began to file into the classroom they quickly found the name-tags she had placed on each desk and ignored them. They sat where they had been sitting for the last month and a half. She finally got them organized, to her satisfaction, and introduced herself.

“Good morning class,” she said. She pointed to the corner of the board where she had written her name. “My name is Miss Fortune and I’m your new teacher.”

The class snickered. Miss Isobel Fortune felt her face go-to crimson.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. Broken teeth
  2. Broken hearts
  3. Broken dishes

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #134- Backstage Lady

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



It was Nashville. I was sixteen years old and had my Grampa’s old guitar strapped across my back when I signed up for the open mic contest. The prize was five hundred dollars and I had written a song about my Momma, my broken heart, and a dog because the rules said you could only perform an original piece, something that you had written.

When I checked in with the lady backstage she told me that I’d be going on right after a guy named Marvin Joplin.

I waited. When I heard them introduce Marvin I got ready and moved to the wings. I listened as he performed a song that I had heard Johnny Cash playing on the radio that very day. As he was getting into the bridge, I went to the backstage lady and complained, “You said that we had to perform an original song.”

“That’s right,” she said.

“I heard Johnny Cash play that song on the radio,” I continued.

“Yes,” she smiled and drew the vowel out long and slow.

I asked her if I could go on later, not right now, not right after Marvin Joplin.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. Humor and truth
  2. Cut deep
  3. I don’t need an excuse

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #133- An Intensive Analysis of an Individual Unit Stressing Developmental Factors In Relation To Environment

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



After receiving the letter from Addison Dalecki, Logan changed his plans and went home to spend Christmas with his father. She had been Dad’s lawyer for as long as he could remember.

The letter advised Logan that his father was quite ill and wanted to see his only son again before dying. There was also the matter of the will that Ms Dalecki wanted to discuss. It seemed that Logan was about to inherit all his father’s business, real estate, and personal holdings. He wasn’t sure what the exact size of the estate was but knew it was sizeable, he estimated it to be somewhere in the tens of millions of dollars.

Logan phoned the lawyer’s office and made an appointment for three days before Christmas and booked a ticket back home to Colorado. He left two days later. On the day before his appointment with the lawyer, a taxi ferried him from the airport to his father’s house. Dad was surprised but happy, to see him, “Logan,” his father said, “I didn’t think you were going to be able to come home for the holidays this year. How long are you going to be able to stay?”

“I’m not sure yet, Dad. I have an appointment in town tomorrow that will probably help me to know more, but I expect it will be at least a few days.”

His father smiled and started to say something but was suddenly seized by a fit of coughing. When he finally recovered his breath and composure, he spat some blood into his handkerchief and said, “Make yourself at home, son. Anders can help you get your things to your room. I need to get some rest. I’ll join you tonight at seven.” That night over dinner the father and son discussed weather and sports. What were the chances that the Avalanche had of winning the cup this season? How about those Broncos? How much snow was up at the resort? They did not speak of each other’s health, wellbeing, or state of mind. They discussed nothing personal. That was the way it had always been between these two.

The next morning at nine Logan told his father that he was going to his appointment and was unsure how long he would be. “If I’m back in time, Dad, we should go to the club for lunch. Would you like that?” He took a car from the garage and drove to Lawyer Dalecki’s office in the city. There he learned that his father had only a week or two to live. She told him that he was the sole beneficiary of the insurance policy and inheritor of the estate. He should plan on coming into cash, businesses, and property worth over 250 million dollars. She would know the exact number soon as she was finished consolidating the balance sheets. She should have a figure for him within the next two or three days. Logan missed lunch with his Dad but did remember to call and tell him that he would be tied up until later that evening. He suggested that they postpone lunch until the following day.

His father agreed and Logan found his way to ‘The 303 Lounge.’ It was an upscale bar a few blocks from Dalecki’s office. He began drinking heavily in premature celebration of his newfound wealth.

Logan caught the attention of Marcie Cielo-Vista. She watched from across the room, and noticing the way he spent money, she knew that he was good looking enough. So she found her way over and ended up sitting next to him at the bar where she struck up a conversation.

He bought her a few drinks and invited her out for dinner. She knew a wonderful place, not too far away. At the restaurant, he continued to drink and Marcie switched to club soda – Logan didn’t notice. As he began to sink into the rose coloured world of his newfound wealth, amplified by the amber coloured whisky in his glass; he became more talkative.

“You know, Marcie,” he said, “I’m an ordinary man. I work at a publishing house in New York City, but in a few weeks, my father will die. When he does, I’ll inherit a couple hundred million dollars.”

Impressed, Marcie took him home with her that evening. Five days later, after a whirlwind courtship and a ceremony in the Magistrate’s office, she became his stepmother.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. somebody else will get that
  2. broken ways
  3. a nickel after the hour

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #132- The Apprentice

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The American Sentence between these words and the prompts are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



 

 


This week’s prompts are:

  1. no truck with you
  2. brand new shoes
  3. didn’t know about the camera

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #131- Homecoming Part I

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The stuff between these words and the prompts are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



I think the first time I ever saw him was in 1969. I was riding a greyhound across Texas, making my way to Lordsburg where I had gotten a gig writing for the Hidalgo County Herald. I was on my way up threading my way to success and the Herald was my first stop on what I was sure would be a long and lucrative career. I don’t know why I remember him, I only glimpsed him briefly, but there was something about it. The bus had stopped in Weatherford and I saw him through the glass that separated the diner from the rest of the depot. He was sitting in a booth, by himself, sipping a cup of coffee when our eyes met. I paid for a paper, he nodded his head and I hurriedly stuffed change in my pocket and returned to the bus.

That should have been the end of it and I don’t know why it wasn’t. The encounter haunted me for no reason. I’d wake at night in a cold sweat seeing those eyes and that nod; worried and confused because I didn’t understand what it meant.

It might have been a year later, maybe a year and a half, so it would’ve been ‘70 or ‘71. I was settled into my job at the Herald and I was working the Sports desk when I saw him next. Sports news in Lordsburg consisted of getting the national stories off the ticker and paring them down for publication. We also covered high school sports. Of course, there was only one high school in town, Lordsburg High, and they only had about a hundred students. Football players played both ways, offence and defence. Lordsburg would play schools from Silver City, San Simon, Duncan, Cliff, and Animas. There were no other towns large enough to have their own high schools.

Lordsburg high could also field a baseball and basketball teams. Most of the players played all three sports. I was driving to Silver City for a football game. It was late in the season and it was Silver City’s Homecoming. They were playing Lordsburg. It was getting dark and I had just passed through the town of White Signal when I saw him. Of course, I didn’t know it was him right away. He was standing on the side of a barren stretch of highway 90 with his thumb out – hitching a ride. It was the eyes that caught me. I recognized the eyes right away, but I couldn’t remember why. It took me a couple of miles to put it together and once I remembered I had seen him last in Weatherford. I executed a three-point turn and headed back to where I had seen him. On the way, I thought about what it might be that spooked me about this guy. I was at a loss, had no idea.

I got back to White Signal without seeing him. I turned around again and searched, but he was gone. I had to get to Silver City if I wanted to catch the opening kickoff so I chalked it up to ‘one of those things that make you go hmmm’ and continued the rest of the way to the game. The home team won the game 21 – 17. I met a lady that night in the bar of the Palace Hotel and forgot all about the hitcher I had seen earlier.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. blue as a robin’s egg
  2. slow consumption
  3. it’s a magic bean

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #130- A Dizygotic Pair

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The stuff between these words and the prompts are my attempt at character sketches. What do you think? Do you understand these sisters? Have you met in a previous life?
Write because… Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



Abigail and Gabrielle, known as the Gibson twins

Gabby – a bruiser of a girl
A brawler who never backed down from a fight
Dark haired, dark eyed, a chipped front tooth
Corkscrew curls that tumble down past her shoulders
Quick to smile
Six foot, four and an Ivy League grad

Abby – a fragile girl
Pale, with a kind spirit and mischievous ways
Curious about everything, an eloquent negotiator, a peacemaker
Mouse brown hair, wispy, shingle bob cut
Green eyes to die for
Five foot, three. A seller of sewing notions with a small shop downtown


This week’s prompts are:

  1. Pennywhistle Band
  2. followed her to Selma
  3. love’s the word

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

     

OLWG #129- C.C. Jones, Investigations

This week’s prompts are at the bottom.
Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



In flamboyant gold lettering, his business cards read, “C.C. Jones, Investigations”

People seldom asked but when they did he would usually try to dodge the question or lie.

“I just put it there because it sounds good,” he would say, and then he would add, “You can call me Charles.”

Only his momma and his birth certificate knew the truth; oh, and me. I knew the truth too. I knew because you learn things about people when they are certain they’re about to die. They tell you things they wouldn’t tell another living soul.

Charles and I had both been Marines in Khe Sanh in early 1968 and spent a couple of months defending the Garrison there. Now I helped him out with his business, “C.C. Jones, Investigations.” He was a private eye and I was just an old war buddy who had needed a job. On behalf of C.C. Jones Investigations, I staked out a lot of cheap motels, served a lot of papers and took a lot of compromising photos for clients. I had a license to carry a concealed weapon but in the late ’60s and early ’70s, it was easy for Vietnam vets to get a permit.

It was in Khe Sanh that I learned C.C.’s mother had sold the naming rights for her firstborn son. She got $5,000 from a company in Georgia when she named her boy. In those days that was a lot of money, but it was not money well spent by the company. Nobody ever called the man Coca Cola Jones. As far as I know, only C.C., his momma, and I ever knew what the initials stood for. Everyone else called him C.C. or Charles.

C.C advertised himself as an expert in things like locating missing persons, asset protection, and financial investigations, but most of what we did was sneaking around to catch cheating husbands and/or wives. That is until she came through the door.

It was lunchtime and I had gone down the street to pick up a couple of hydraulic sandwiches, our normal noontime fare. When I got back to the office I could hear some dame talking with C.C. in the office behind the reception area. Our receptionist had quit six months earlier, but C.C. and I still kept our desks in the office behind. If we left the door to the reception open we could hear any customers or bill collectors come in and we could deal with them accordingly.

I rapped my knuckles on the open door and stepped inside she turned around. Skinny jeans and a white tee allowed an effective display of her chest, apparently a source of great pride for her. She wore her blonde hair cut about shoulder length. It was thin and wispy. She wore no makeup, and she didn’t need any.

“Ms Reynolds, this is my associate, Leonard. We should get him up to speed on your situation as well.”

“Should I begin again?” she asked and C.C. nodded his head.

“OK, well then – the last time I saw Dean was in Monaco…”


This week’s prompts are:

  1. racing the moon
  2. the tapping of a blind man’s cane
  3. locked in tight

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!