OLWG #142- Bedtime for Idogbe

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are about writing, written just for practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



Idogbe brushed his fang and peed. Reluctantly, he shuffled his feet and moved down the hallway to his bedroom.

“Go on and get in bed, Idogbe,” his mother hollered from the kitchen, “Pick out a book and I’ll be right up there to read to you.”

Idogbe reached around the door jamb, clicked on the light, and studied his room, all clear. From the shelf, he pulled out his favourite book. It was about a worm that lived in a greengrocer’s shop. The worm had grown weary of eating regular vegetables and fruits. He wanted to add some variety to his diet. So when the greengrocer began stocking coconuts the little worm had to figure out a way to get inside so that he could eat it.

He looked in the closet and under the bed but he didn’t see anything scary so he crawled between the sheets, squeezed his eyes shut, and clutched the book tightly to his chest.

Mom came up just a few minutes later to read and tuck him in. She seemed to be crying. A tear was making its way from the big eye in the center of her forehead and sliding down past her nose.

“What’s wrong, Momma?” Idogbe asked.

“Nothing’s wrong, baby,” Momma said as she straightened the duvet. “I’ve just been chopping onions in the kitchen. What book did you pick out?”

Idogbe showed her the coconut book and she rolled her eye, “Again?” she exclaimed, “Can’t you pick out a different one. I’ve read this book every night for the past week. What do you say? Shall I get us a different one tonight?”

“OK, Momma. Can you get the one about the zoo? And can you check in the attic too?”

“Check the attic… whatever for?”

“I think that big, scary kid lives there. I know she lives somewhere over my bed. Maybe she’s on the roof. Could you check the roof too, Momma?”

“Idogbe, don’t be silly, there are no scary kids living over your bed. You have a big imagination for such a little monster.”


This week’s prompts are:

  1. that was the last anyone ever saw of him
  2. Simon doesn’t like you
  3. selling bibles

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #141- ΥΦ

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are about writing, written just for practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



Daniel Hornsnyder crept down the alley that ran between Hemlock Drive and Cedar Street. Juliet lived with her parents in the red brick-two story that stood mid-block on Cedar. Daniel wore a loose white shirt made from some sort of cotton with big baggy sleeves gathered at his wrists and his waist. His footwear were more like socks than the boots they were advertised as; and he wore tights. They were tights with a sewn in codpiece no less.

He wasn’t sure who it would be, but someone would be watching or perhaps even filming. The closer he got to Juliet’s the more he regretted this. It wasn’t supposed to be this hard. His father had been U-Phi and so had his father’s father. Daniel didn’t think he should have to go through this initiation.

When he found the house, he scaled the back fence and leapt gently to the lawn below. He prayed that there wasn’t a dog and he stood ready to run if there was.

When he wasn’t immediately attacked, Daniel looked around to get his bearings. He spotted the second floor balcony just where Tyler had told him it would be. Television lizard light illuminated the curtained sliding glass door that led into the house. That, Tyler had assured him, was Juliet’s bedroom.

He gathered all his wits about him and strode directly across the lawn where he took his place near the Manzanita Hedge growing below the balcony. He cleared his throat and spoke; loud, but not too loud.

“But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou her maid art far more fair than she:
Be not her maid, since she is envious;
Her vestal livery is but sick and green
And none but fools do wear it; cast it off.”

He waited, and after a moment he heard the glass door slide open, “Goddamn it, Junior! Is that you again? I told you to knock this shit off,” she paused then when she saw that Daniel was clearly not Junior. At least not the Junior she expected. “Who the hell are you?” she asked.

“I’m supposed to be Romeo.”

“Why, exactly, are you here Romeo?”

“Um, I’m here because I’m pledging Upsilon Phi, and because your name is Juliet.” Daniel answered.

“Well, damn…” Juliet muttered and Daniel could almost see the gear wheels turning in her head, “come on up then, boy. No wait, I’m coming down. Do you have a car? Do you have anything to drink?” She disappeared back inside the sliding door and turned off the TV. Her room went dark and seconds later the back door swung open. Juliet emerged on the patio holding a bottle of what appeared to be Vodka. She ran on her toes to Daniel, threw her arms around his neck and kissed him full on the mouth.

“Let’s go.” She said.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. throwing pennies
  2. when the dust clears
  3. watch me go

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #140- Always a Writer

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are about writing, written just for practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



When she was a child, she drew pictures with crayons and made up stories to go along

As she learned to form letters she copied them carefully on lined paper, and pretended they were stories, and that she could read them; to her sister and the dog

Fantastical tales

Adventures of dragons, space travelers, kings and queens

Princes and Princesses

She wrote essays

Schoolgirl romance

College admission applications

Plays, screenplays

Dialogue, lots and lots of dialogue

Now she writes verse

Poems of all types, but mostly

Poems that throw stones

No quarter asked for

None given


This week’s prompts are:

  1. jump
  2. sad eyes
  3. Mississippi corn bread

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #139- No Welcome

This week’s prompts (only two) are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



When our boy came home with the other few
They didn’t get a parade
No tables were laid.

Their war was detested.

They battled the enemy overseas
But upon their return
Were surprised to learn

That they were now the marauders,
The invaders, the brigands and highwaymen.
Our boy never asked for this;

This stain that won’t wash off.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. we cling together
  2. fishermen pulling up stones

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #138- Yakitori

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



Dennis was a runner and everyone in the company knew that. So when he went to the corporate offices he shouldn’t have been surprised when Uchida-san met him at the station in Shimosuwa. The hotel, where he was to stay, was close to the station so the two old friends walked there to get Dennis checked in.

“You should get some rest,” Uchida told Dennis. “I’ll come back at six and we can go have dinner. I know a Yakitori place nearby and I have some things to discuss with you. We can do that over a nice meal.”

Dennis agreed and retired to his room where he showered and napped. A little before six o’clock he was downstairs in the lobby waiting for his friend. When Uchida arrived they decided to walk to the restaurant as it truly was close by. As they walked Uchida-san talked.

“You’ll like this restaurant,” he said, “I come here a lot for Rotary Club meetings and I’ve told Akio about you. Akio is the proprietor of the restaurant. He’s a runner too and is anxious to meet you.

“Today is Saturday and tomorrow is Sunday. Tomorrow they will hold the Lake Suwa Marathon. Runners come from all over Japan to run the course around the lake.” At this point Uchida reached into a plastic carry bag that he had with him a pulled out a bright green, maybe even chartreuse, running singlet that read Dennis in dark blue letters across the chest. “We took the liberty of entering you in the race. Hope you don’t mind.” He grabbed Dennis by the elbow and steered him beneath a blue and white noren into a small restaurant with four or five tables, three of them occupied, and a long bar. An inscrutable gentleman with a pencil-thin moustache stood smoking behind the bar. He lit up when he saw Uchida and Dennis come in and he indicated a couple of seats at the centre of the bar that had been held for them.

They sat and after a brief conversation in Japanese Uchida made introductions.

“Dennis, this is my friend and the owner of this establishment, Akio Satō. Satō, kore wa watashi no yūjin, Denisudesu.” Akiro Satō bowed at the waist, smiled and held out his hand. The two shook hands and Akiro recited a memorized line of English to Dennis.

“Nice to meet you Dennis-san.” He again waved Dennis and Uchida to their seats. More conversation in Japanese as the two took their proffered spots at the bar and Akiro moved down a couple of steps and drew three glasses of Asahi. He sat two of them on the bar in front of his two guests. He held on to the third.

Dennis still held the new tank top in his left hand but lifted the beer with his right, “Campai!” he said. The glasses clinked and the golden liquid was imbibed by all.  A friendly and congenial atmosphere swallowed the three and conversation flew back and forth even though only Uchida could speak both English and Japanese. Skewers of grilled meat on delicate porcelain plates soon appeared as if by magic on the bar and all three began to eat and drink. The night grew long and dinner was winding down when Akiro lifted an index finger and rattled off a line of rapid-fire Japanese. Uchida nodded his head and agreed with whatever had been said. Akiro turned and stumbled back to the kitchen. He returned with a single plate on which lay maybe five pieces of marbled red meat.

He looked at Dennis and began to speak in Japanese. Uchida-san began translating even as Akiro was speaking. “Tomorrow, Dennis-san, you will run the marathon. With that in mind, I would like to present to you a dish that will make you strong and fast.” He paused, “Please accept this gift for luck in the race tomorrow.” He indicated the plate of red meat that had been placed on the bar.

Using his chopsticks, Dennis picked up a single piece of the sliced meat. Almost ceremonially he raised it to Akiro and placed it gently into his mouth. He chewed.

“It’s delicious,” he said, “melts in my mouth.” He offered some to both Uchida-san and his host. Both declined so he finished the rest.

Akiro would take no money from his two guests and so with great formality and gratitude Uchida and Dennis took their leave.

“What was that that I ate?” Dennis asked Uchida on the pavement outside the restaurant.

“Horse,” Uchida answered, “Horse prepared sashimi-style. It’s good, isn’t it?”


This week’s prompts are:

  1. when the revolution comes
  2. desperate and blue
  3. like old lovers

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #137- Fields

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



Hector shifted the pack he carried over one shoulder as he walked. He was northbound, in search of a better life. He whistled to himself as he made his way up the dusty shoulder of a narrow two-lane highway, but he slowed when he noticed the ruckus ahead. Cars were pulled to the side of the road and parked willy-nilly; blocking his dirt and gravel pathway. A crowd was gathered and there was a hum of conversation. It was all still too far away for him to make out distinct words but the colourful buzz of folks talking to, for, and over one another. They all seemed to be looking to the east, towards the sunrise. Some of them were pointing, some were quite animated, while others were still – almost stoic in their contemplation.

Hector couldn’t yet see what they were seeing. The land sloped away.

When he got closer he surveyed a field of bright colours. Pinks and reds, like the sunrise. Oranges and yellows, like the sunset over the Pacific. Brilliant fields of flowers stretched to the east as far as he could see. This was a magnificent valley. Hector smiled to himself. He thought he should be able to find work here. He knew the earth, he understood the soil, he was home.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. In the middle of the kitchen floor
  2. that’s what Saturdays are for
  3. just me and these streetlights

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #136- La Llorona

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice, me retelling an old Mexican ghost story. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



It was a long time ago, mi hijos, long before New Mexico became a state; in the village of Bosque Tepeco, a young girl was born. She was named Maria and she lived with her Mamá in an adobe casa with dirt floors and no glass in the windows. Her mother worked in the Cantina so that she could pay the bills. No one was sure who her father was. As Maria grew, she became more beautiful from day to day.

One day a very rich and handsome man, Josué Obregón, passed through Bosque Tepeco and happened to catch a glimpse of Maria as she was bathing at the river. He was immediately smitten and stole her away to his fine hacienda outside Hierba del Cobre (a town which no longer exists).

For many years Maria and her husband tried in vain to conceive a child. Their failure to conceive strained their relationship and Don Obregón took to travelling. He carried on with other women in other towns and his absences from home grew longer and longer. One day he returned to Hierba del Cobre to find that his wife was with child. She gave birth to twins; boys. The boys’ father doted on his sons, for a time, but the fire he had once felt for Maria was now cold and his old habits soon returned. He would slip away for weeks or even months at a time.

One day when the boys were about five years old Don Obregón came home, with a younger woman, named Iliana. He introduced her to his sons and moved her into his house. Maria was hurt. She was furious. And, she snapped. She took her boys to the river and, in a rage, drowned them. When she realized what she had done she searched for her sons, but to no avail, The river currents had already carried them away. She drowned herself as well.

Now she is doomed to forever search for her lost sons. She wanders near rivers, wearing a white gown and a veil. She is known as La Llorona, (in English The Weeping Woman) and on dark nights you can hear her crying; alone and in despair. If you ever hear her, you must turn and run in the opposite direction. My Abuelo told me that she will sometimes mistake children out alone at night for her own, and kidnap them. When she realizes what she has done she drowns the innocent waifs.

She sifts the river bottom in perpetuity, searching for her boys.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. we’ve run out
  2. Bird on the box
  3. A one ring circus

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!