OLWG #138- Yakitori

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



Dennis was a runner and everyone in the company knew that. So when he went to the corporate offices he shouldn’t have been surprised when Uchida-san met him at the station in Shimosuwa. The hotel, where he was to stay, was close to the station so the two old friends walked there to get Dennis checked in.

“You should get some rest,” Uchida told Dennis. “I’ll come back at six and we can go have dinner. I know a Yakitori place nearby and I have some things to discuss with you. We can do that over a nice meal.”

Dennis agreed and retired to his room where he showered and napped. A little before six o’clock he was downstairs in the lobby waiting for his friend. When Uchida arrived they decided to walk to the restaurant as it truly was close by. As they walked Uchida-san talked.

“You’ll like this restaurant,” he said, “I come here a lot for Rotary Club meetings and I’ve told Akio about you. Akio is the proprietor of the restaurant. He’s a runner too and is anxious to meet you.

“Today is Saturday and tomorrow is Sunday. Tomorrow they will hold the Lake Suwa Marathon. Runners come from all over Japan to run the course around the lake.” At this point Uchida reached into a plastic carry bag that he had with him a pulled out a bright green, maybe even chartreuse, running singlet that read Dennis in dark blue letters across the chest. “We took the liberty of entering you in the race. Hope you don’t mind.” He grabbed Dennis by the elbow and steered him beneath a blue and white noren into a small restaurant with four or five tables, three of them occupied, and a long bar. An inscrutable gentleman with a pencil-thin moustache stood smoking behind the bar. He lit up when he saw Uchida and Dennis come in and he indicated a couple of seats at the centre of the bar that had been held for them.

They sat and after a brief conversation in Japanese Uchida made introductions.

“Dennis, this is my friend and the owner of this establishment, Akio Satō. Satō, kore wa watashi no yūjin, Denisudesu.” Akiro Satō bowed at the waist, smiled and held out his hand. The two shook hands and Akiro recited a memorized line of English to Dennis.

“Nice to meet you Dennis-san.” He again waved Dennis and Uchida to their seats. More conversation in Japanese as the two took their proffered spots at the bar and Akiro moved down a couple of steps and drew three glasses of Asahi. He sat two of them on the bar in front of his two guests. He held on to the third.

Dennis still held the new tank top in his left hand but lifted the beer with his right, “Campai!” he said. The glasses clinked and the golden liquid was imbibed by all.  A friendly and congenial atmosphere swallowed the three and conversation flew back and forth even though only Uchida could speak both English and Japanese. Skewers of grilled meat on delicate porcelain plates soon appeared as if by magic on the bar and all three began to eat and drink. The night grew long and dinner was winding down when Akiro lifted an index finger and rattled off a line of rapid-fire Japanese. Uchida nodded his head and agreed with whatever had been said. Akiro turned and stumbled back to the kitchen. He returned with a single plate on which lay maybe five pieces of marbled red meat.

He looked at Dennis and began to speak in Japanese. Uchida-san began translating even as Akiro was speaking. “Tomorrow, Dennis-san, you will run the marathon. With that in mind, I would like to present to you a dish that will make you strong and fast.” He paused, “Please accept this gift for luck in the race tomorrow.” He indicated the plate of red meat that had been placed on the bar.

Using his chopsticks, Dennis picked up a single piece of the sliced meat. Almost ceremonially he raised it to Akiro and placed it gently into his mouth. He chewed.

“It’s delicious,” he said, “melts in my mouth.” He offered some to both Uchida-san and his host. Both declined so he finished the rest.

Akiro would take no money from his two guests and so with great formality and gratitude Uchida and Dennis took their leave.

“What was that that I ate?” Dennis asked Uchida on the pavement outside the restaurant.

“Horse,” Uchida answered, “Horse prepared sashimi-style. It’s good, isn’t it?”


This week’s prompts are:

  1. when the revolution comes
  2. desperate and blue
  3. like old lovers

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #137- Fields

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



Hector shifted the pack he carried over one shoulder as he walked. He was northbound, in search of a better life. He whistled to himself as he made his way up the dusty shoulder of a narrow two-lane highway, but he slowed when he noticed the ruckus ahead. Cars were pulled to the side of the road and parked willy-nilly; blocking his dirt and gravel pathway. A crowd was gathered and there was a hum of conversation. It was all still too far away for him to make out distinct words but the colourful buzz of folks talking to, for, and over one another. They all seemed to be looking to the east, towards the sunrise. Some of them were pointing, some were quite animated, while others were still – almost stoic in their contemplation.

Hector couldn’t yet see what they were seeing. The land sloped away.

When he got closer he surveyed a field of bright colours. Pinks and reds, like the sunrise. Oranges and yellows, like the sunset over the Pacific. Brilliant fields of flowers stretched to the east as far as he could see. This was a magnificent valley. Hector smiled to himself. He thought he should be able to find work here. He knew the earth, he understood the soil, he was home.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. In the middle of the kitchen floor
  2. that’s what Saturdays are for
  3. just me and these streetlights

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #136- La Llorona

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice, me retelling an old Mexican ghost story. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



It was a long time ago, mi hijos, long before New Mexico became a state; in the village of Bosque Tepeco, a young girl was born. She was named Maria and she lived with her Mamá in an adobe casa with dirt floors and no glass in the windows. Her mother worked in the Cantina so that she could pay the bills. No one was sure who her father was. As Maria grew, she became more beautiful from day to day.

One day a very rich and handsome man, Josué Obregón, passed through Bosque Tepeco and happened to catch a glimpse of Maria as she was bathing at the river. He was immediately smitten and stole her away to his fine hacienda outside Hierba del Cobre (a town which no longer exists).

For many years Maria and her husband tried in vain to conceive a child. Their failure to conceive strained their relationship and Don Obregón took to travelling. He carried on with other women in other towns and his absences from home grew longer and longer. One day he returned to Hierba del Cobre to find that his wife was with child. She gave birth to twins; boys. The boys’ father doted on his sons, for a time, but the fire he had once felt for Maria was now cold and his old habits soon returned. He would slip away for weeks or even months at a time.

One day when the boys were about five years old Don Obregón came home, with a younger woman, named Iliana. He introduced her to his sons and moved her into his house. Maria was hurt. She was furious. And, she snapped. She took her boys to the river and, in a rage, drowned them. When she realized what she had done she searched for her sons, but to no avail, The river currents had already carried them away. She drowned herself as well.

Now she is doomed to forever search for her lost sons. She wanders near rivers, wearing a white gown and a veil. She is known as La Llorona, (in English The Weeping Woman) and on dark nights you can hear her crying; alone and in despair. If you ever hear her, you must turn and run in the opposite direction. My Abuelo told me that she will sometimes mistake children out alone at night for her own, and kidnap them. When she realizes what she has done she drowns the innocent waifs.

She sifts the river bottom in perpetuity, searching for her boys.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. we’ve run out
  2. Bird on the box
  3. A one ring circus

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #135- MissFortune

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



When Isobel Fortune finished school and earned her teaching credentials she began applying for jobs with the neighbourhood schools around her parent’s home, where she lived with her Mum and Dad. She had grown up and lived in this house since her Dad had been transferred from Brighton when she was four years old. She had attended Burford School on the bottom road when she was a child and had been in constant trouble almost the entire time she was there.

Isobel had no luck with the local schools so she began to expand her search and sending her CV to schools closer to the city; then into the city proper. It took almost an entire year but she finally got an invitation for an interview with the headmaster of a primary school close to the city centre. Many of the students came from immigrant and indigent families. They relied on the school for lunches and rudimentary supplies like paper and pencils. She took the position teaching Year 3 and started a month and a half into the school year.

She arrived early on that first day and made her way to her classroom. The class had been covered by a temporary instructor since the beginning of the year and she was not too sure what to expect. She organized her lesson plans and neatly printed her name in the top right corner of the blackboard board at the front of the classroom. She wasn’t sure why they called it a blackboard when it was green.

When the bell sounded and the students began to file into the classroom they quickly found the name-tags she had placed on each desk and ignored them. They sat where they had been sitting for the last month and a half. She finally got them organized, to her satisfaction, and introduced herself.

“Good morning class,” she said. She pointed to the corner of the board where she had written her name. “My name is Miss Fortune and I’m your new teacher.”

The class snickered. Miss Isobel Fortune felt her face go-to crimson.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. Broken teeth
  2. Broken hearts
  3. Broken dishes

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #134- Backstage Lady

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



It was Nashville. I was sixteen years old and had my Grampa’s old guitar strapped across my back when I signed up for the open mic contest. The prize was five hundred dollars and I had written a song about my Momma, my broken heart, and a dog because the rules said you could only perform an original piece, something that you had written.

When I checked in with the lady backstage she told me that I’d be going on right after a guy named Marvin Joplin.

I waited. When I heard them introduce Marvin I got ready and moved to the wings. I listened as he performed a song that I had heard Johnny Cash playing on the radio that very day. As he was getting into the bridge, I went to the backstage lady and complained, “You said that we had to perform an original song.”

“That’s right,” she said.

“I heard Johnny Cash play that song on the radio,” I continued.

“Yes,” she smiled and drew the vowel out long and slow.

I asked her if I could go on later, not right now, not right after Marvin Joplin.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. Humor and truth
  2. Cut deep
  3. I don’t need an excuse

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #133- An Intensive Analysis of an Individual Unit Stressing Developmental Factors In Relation To Environment

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The words below are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



After receiving the letter from Addison Dalecki, Logan changed his plans and went home to spend Christmas with his father. She had been Dad’s lawyer for as long as he could remember.

The letter advised Logan that his father was quite ill and wanted to see his only son again before dying. There was also the matter of the will that Ms Dalecki wanted to discuss. It seemed that Logan was about to inherit all his father’s business, real estate, and personal holdings. He wasn’t sure what the exact size of the estate was but knew it was sizeable, he estimated it to be somewhere in the tens of millions of dollars.

Logan phoned the lawyer’s office and made an appointment for three days before Christmas and booked a ticket back home to Colorado. He left two days later. On the day before his appointment with the lawyer, a taxi ferried him from the airport to his father’s house. Dad was surprised but happy, to see him, “Logan,” his father said, “I didn’t think you were going to be able to come home for the holidays this year. How long are you going to be able to stay?”

“I’m not sure yet, Dad. I have an appointment in town tomorrow that will probably help me to know more, but I expect it will be at least a few days.”

His father smiled and started to say something but was suddenly seized by a fit of coughing. When he finally recovered his breath and composure, he spat some blood into his handkerchief and said, “Make yourself at home, son. Anders can help you get your things to your room. I need to get some rest. I’ll join you tonight at seven.” That night over dinner the father and son discussed weather and sports. What were the chances that the Avalanche had of winning the cup this season? How about those Broncos? How much snow was up at the resort? They did not speak of each other’s health, wellbeing, or state of mind. They discussed nothing personal. That was the way it had always been between these two.

The next morning at nine Logan told his father that he was going to his appointment and was unsure how long he would be. “If I’m back in time, Dad, we should go to the club for lunch. Would you like that?” He took a car from the garage and drove to Lawyer Dalecki’s office in the city. There he learned that his father had only a week or two to live. She told him that he was the sole beneficiary of the insurance policy and inheritor of the estate. He should plan on coming into cash, businesses, and property worth over 250 million dollars. She would know the exact number soon as she was finished consolidating the balance sheets. She should have a figure for him within the next two or three days. Logan missed lunch with his Dad but did remember to call and tell him that he would be tied up until later that evening. He suggested that they postpone lunch until the following day.

His father agreed and Logan found his way to ‘The 303 Lounge.’ It was an upscale bar a few blocks from Dalecki’s office. He began drinking heavily in premature celebration of his newfound wealth.

Logan caught the attention of Marcie Cielo-Vista. She watched from across the room, and noticing the way he spent money, she knew that he was good looking enough. So she found her way over and ended up sitting next to him at the bar where she struck up a conversation.

He bought her a few drinks and invited her out for dinner. She knew a wonderful place, not too far away. At the restaurant, he continued to drink and Marcie switched to club soda – Logan didn’t notice. As he began to sink into the rose coloured world of his newfound wealth, amplified by the amber coloured whisky in his glass; he became more talkative.

“You know, Marcie,” he said, “I’m an ordinary man. I work at a publishing house in New York City, but in a few weeks, my father will die. When he does, I’ll inherit a couple hundred million dollars.”

Impressed, Marcie took him home with her that evening. Five days later, after a whirlwind courtship and a ceremony in the Magistrate’s office, she became his stepmother.


This week’s prompts are:

  1. somebody else will get that
  2. broken ways
  3. a nickel after the hour

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!

  2. Write something big, Write something small,
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!

OLWG #132- The Apprentice

This week’s prompts are at the bottom. The American Sentence between these words and the prompts are just practice. Practice makes perfect.

Here’s how to play along, if you are unsure.



 

 


This week’s prompts are:

  1. no truck with you
  2. brand new shoes
  3. didn’t know about the camera

  1. Go ahead and dive in, set your imagination free!
    Write something
    Ready, Set, Go – you have 25 minutes, but if that is not possible, take as long as you need and, have fun!